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Dublin Coddle Recipe (Sausage and Potato Stew)


What is Dublin Coddle? Quite simply, it is a stew made from sausage, bacon, potato and onion cooked in a beef stock. A traditional Dublin Coddle cooks (boils) the meats and root vegetables together.

This is an authentic Dublin Coddle recipe. I only slightly wondered off the original recipe by doing 3 things differently:

  1. not including bacon in the stew itself but rather using it as a garnish. I believe the bacon gets rubbery when cooked and served in liquid.
  2. searing the sausages, meaning the sausages where braised and not boiled. I did this for flavor purposes.
  3. inclusion of carrots as an ingredient. A traditional Coddle does not include carrots.

This stew is hot and I don’t mean just popular. It is hot due to the natural fats coming from the sausages and bacon. This fat mixed with the braising liquid, raises the temperature of the Coddle, making it hot, hotter than say a soup like Irish Vegetable Soup which contains no fat. That makes it perfect for cold weather.

What is Coddle?

The word “Coddle” derives from the French term caudle which means to boil gently, parboil or stew.

Coddle is hearty concoction made up from leftovers. There was no specific recipe as a result, but over the years the general recipe has ended up being potatoes, onions, with bacon and sausages added.

What does Coddle mean in Dublin? Ask anyone in Dublin what a Dublin Coddle is – and they’ll tell you it’s a working class hot dish lifted street out of the streets of Dublin!

History of Dublin Coddle

According to Dublin City Council (Comhairle Cathrach Bhaile Átha Cliath), “families would use up any leftover meat on a Thursday, as Catholics couldn’t eat meat on Fridays. Country people who moved into Dublin to find better work opportunities, brought hens and pigs with them to raise for food. After a pig was slaughtered and sold the remains were used to make sausages. The sausages and streaky rashers were boiled up with root vegetables to make a cheap and nutritious meal.” Hence the birth of Dublin Coddle.

Ingredients – What is Dublin Coddle Made of?

  • Beef sausages: preferably fresh butcher sausages – at a pinch use fresh bratwurst.
  • Pork sausages: preferably fresh, links or patties work.
  • Bacon: fresh, smoked.
  • Potatoes: any type, I used homegrown russets and red potatoes.
  • Carrots.
  • Onions.
  • Stock: use beef stock.

How to Make a Dublin Coddle

Dublin Coddle can be made stovetop, or Instant Pot. As this recipe uses braising (searing meat and then finishing the cooking by adding liquid) a slow cooker cannot be used from start to finish. A slow cooker can be used if the meats are only cooked in liquid, or if the meats are seared in a pan first and are then transferred to a slow cooker.

This recipe is for a sausage Coddle, the bacon becomes a generous garnish to finish the dish.

Instructions How to Make a Traditional Dublin Coddle Recipe

These are the instructions how to make Dublin Coddle in an Instant Pot.

With a sharp knife slice bacon into strips. This works better when the bacon is cold.

Place it in the Instant Pot, press the Sauté button and sauté the bacon strips for 8-10 minutes until golden brown.

While the bacon is cooking, it’s time to prepare the sausages. Remove the skins from the beef sausages with a pair of sharp scissors. Discard the casings.

Cut the beef sausages into pieces.

When the bacon has finished sautéing, remove it from the Instant Pot and drain on a plate lined with absorbent paper.

Then add the beef sausage pieces to the Instant Pot to cook in the bacon fat. Press the Sauté button and sear the sausages for 5 – 10 minutes, until they take on a brown color.

While the beef sausages are cooking, remove the casing from the pork sausages using sharp scissors.

Remove cooked beef sausages from the Instant Pot. Cut the pork sausages into small pieces. Add pork sausages to the Instant pot and cook.

Brown the pork sausages for about 5 – 10 minutes and then remove.

White onion on a chopping board, half of it is not chopped, the other half is chopped. Chopping knife resting on board.

While the pork sausages are cooking, peel and chop the onions.

Place the onions in to the Instant Pot, there should be sufficient bacon and sausage fat to cook them in. Sauté for about 5-10 minutes until golden brown.

Peel the carrots.

Slice the carrots into thin slices with a sharp knife.

Add the carrots to the onions in the Instant Pot and add beef stock, salt, pepper and bay leaves. Switch the Instant Pot from Sauté to Slow Cook mode.

Wash the potatoes if keeping the skin on, otherwise peel them. Chop them into sizable chunks. Add to the Instant Pot.

Add the beef and pork sausages to the Instant Pot. Save the bacon for a garnish. Cook the Dublin Coddle for 4 hours on Slow Cook ‘Normal’ until the vegetables are soft.

Flexibility with Dublin Coddle

Add ins include:

  • shredded cabbage – add with the rest of the vegetables.
  • barley – add in the final 30 minutes before the coddle is ready for barley with a little bite, or 40 minutes if you want soft barley.
  • root vegetables such as parsnips and turnips, add in chopped raw pieces the same time as the carrots.
  • garlic, raw or roasted is a delicious add in. Add raw garlic to the onion once the onion has sautéed for 5 minutes. Add roasted garlic 30 minutes before the Coddle is ready.

Substitutions include:

  • Use cider instead of beef stock for a Dublin Coddle that is slightly lighter in color and flavor.
  • Use Guinness or other Irish or local stout instead of beef stock.

Alternative cooking methods:

  • Stovetop: Cook bacon in a large stew pot on the stove top. Remove when crispy golden brown. Add all the other ingredients to the pot and cook on the stove top. No adjustments needed to the recipe. Use the bacon as a garnish.
  • Dutch oven Dublin Coddle. This recipe can be easily adjusted to make a Dutch oven Dublin Coddle. Cook the bacon and sear the sausages in batches, in a Dutch oven on the stovetop. Add all the ingredients (except the bacon) to the Dutch oven and place in a 325 degrees F / 160 degrees C. for 1 hour and 45 minutes. Serve hot and sprinkle bacon strips over the top to garnish.
  • Slow cooker: a Traditional Dublin Coddle (one that boils all the meats) can be prepared from start to finish in a slow cooker. Add all the ingredients into the slow cooker and cook the Coddle for 4 hours on high or 8 hours on low. The flavor and look of the Dublin Coddle will be a bit different from my recipe.

Best Sausage for Dublin Coddle

A combination of beef and pork sausages is ideal. Steak sausages are also good. I would avoid using chicken or turkey sausages as they are a little too lean and light on flavor.

In America, pork sausage links, breakfast links or sausage patties are good options. Do not opt for flavored links such as maple or brown sugar links.

In Ireland / UK there are many more options. Purchase fresh pork sausages such as Clonakilty, Mallon’s or Denny’s.

Fresh Beef or steak sausages from the butcher or even fresh bratwursts are ideal. Avoid pre cooked beef sausages, especially the ones with cheese as an ingredient.

Do not use any type of hotdog sausage / wiener / frankfurter sausage. Save those for the grill!

Uses for Dubin Coddle

Dublin Coddle can be served for lunch and dinner. It’s easy to pack in a flask (thermos), though you’ll definitely be needing a spoon for this meal!

Traditionally served with a couple of slices of Wheaten or Soda Bread, slathered with Irish butter and a cold pint of Guinness, this dish is becoming more popular in the Irish pub scene.

Leftovers

Store leftover Irish Dublin Coddle, in an airtight container, in the refrigerator for up to 3 days.

Freeze this Irish Coddle for up to 6 months in the freezer. Defrost overnight in the refrigerator and reheat, preferably stove top until piping hot.

Got Questions?

I’ve got answers – hopefully!

What is the difference between a Coddle and a stew?

It depends on who you are asking and where. If you are asking an Irish person in Dublin, they’ll tell you a Coddle is a ‘city man’s stew’ with all sorts of leftover meats and whatever available vegetables thrown into a pot and cooked. With this approach and lack of exact recipe, a Coddle will taste different every time it is made. A stew on the other hand, is always thought of as an Irish Stew. Made with beef or lamb, root vegetables cooked in beef stock and / or Guinness. It has intentional ingredients and a known end result!

Is Dublin Coddle a soup?

Dublin Coddle is not a soup, it is a thrown together stew. If you want to make it feel more soup like, add more braising liquid (beef stock preferably), not water.

Are there other types of Coddle?

Yes. This recipe is for a traditional Dublin Coddle that uses sausage and bacon for a meat base and root vegetables for bulk and stock as a cooking medium. There are other mentions of Coddle all over Ireland. Traditionally, an Irish Coddle recipe used up any type of meat leftovers, any vegetables and any available grains such as oats. This flexible Coddle recipe came about in the late 1700’s when anything and everything went into a stew pot that hung all day over a low fire in the farmhouse kitchen. The end result was a hot filling stew .

Why do you remove the sausage casing?

I do this because I want the Dublin Coddle to be as tender as possible. Pig’s intestines are typically used for pork sausage casings. These can be chewy. Even synthetic, non animal based, edible skins made from collagen and cellulose are chewy. So, it’s really about mouth feel. I want the sausages to be as tender as possible.

Dublin Coddle in a white bowl garnished with bacon and parsley.

Dublin Coddle Recipe Sausage and Potato Stew

What is Dublin Coddle? Quite simply, it is a stew made from sausage, bacon, potato and onion cooked in a beef stock. A traditional Dublin Coddle cooks (boils) the meats and root vegetables together.
5 from 5 votes
Prep Time 1 hour
Cook Time 4 hours
Total Time 5 hours
Course Main Course
Cuisine Irish
Servings 6
Calories 906 kcal

Ingredients
 
 

  • 1 lb beef sausages
  • 12 oz pork sausages
  • 1 lb bacon
  • 2.5 lbs potatoes
  • 8 oz carrots
  • 2 onions medium
  • 3 bay leaves fresh
  • 20 oz beef stock
  • 1 tsp each salt and pepper

Instructions
 

  • With a sharp knife slice bacon into strips. This works better when the bacon is cold. Place it in the Instant Pot, press the Sauté button and sauté the bacon strips for 8-10 minutes until golden brown.
  • Now prepare the sausages. Remove the skins from the beef sausages with a pair of sharp scissors, then cut into pieces. Discard the casings.
  • When the bacon has finished sautéing, remove it from the Instant Pot and drain on a plate lined with absorbent paper.
  • Then add the beef sausage pieces to the Instant Pot to cook in the bacon fat. Press the Sauté button and sear the sausages for 5 – 10 minutes, until they take on a brown color.
  • While the beef sausages are cooking, remove the casing from the pork sausages using sharp scissors. Cut the pork sausages into small pieces and place in the Instant pot once the beef sausages have finished cooking and have been removed.
  • Brown the pork sausages for about 5 – 10 minutes and then remove.
  • While the pork sausages are cooking, peel and chop the onions.
  • Place the onions in to the Instant Pot, there should be sufficient bacon and sausage fat to cook them in. Sauté for about 5-10 minutes until golden brown.
  • Peel the carrots, then slice them into thin slices with a sharp knife.
  • Add the carrots to the onions in the Instant Pot and add beef stock, salt, pepper and bay leaves. Switch the Instant Pot from Sauté to Slow Cook mode.
  • Wash the potatoes if keeping the skin on, otherwise peel them. Chop them into sizable chunks. Add to the Instant Pot.
  • Add the beef and pork sausages to the Instant Pot. Save the bacon for a garnish. Cook the Dublin Coddle for 4 hours on Slow Cook 'Normal' until the vegetables are soft.
  • Serve hot in a bowl with a generous garnish of bacon bits.

Nutrition

Serving: 8ozCalories: 906kcalCarbohydrates: 42gProtein: 36gFat: 65gSaturated Fat: 22gPolyunsaturated Fat: 10gMonounsaturated Fat: 29gTrans Fat: 0.4gCholesterol: 145mgSodium: 1955mgPotassium: 1623mgFiber: 6gSugar: 5gVitamin A: 6450IUVitamin C: 43mgCalcium: 67mgIron: 4mg
Keyword Bacon, comfort food, Hearty, Irish, Sausages
Tried this recipe?Let us know how it was!

Comments

2 Replies to “Dublin Coddle Recipe (Sausage and Potato Stew)”

  • Alice Gannon
    December 5, 2023
    Hearty and wholesome Irish comfort food at its best! And I'm from Dublin and am appreciating this one especially!
    1. Gillian
      Gillian
      December 5, 2023
      That's good to hear, thank you!

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